History of Robots

This blog is a young woman's account of life before the end of the world. Specifically, a 26 year old Canadian with an English degree and a tendency towards oversharing.

Blog may include books, movies, the paranormal, food, art, television (Game of Thrones, The Walking Dead, Doctor Who, Adventure Time, The Simpsons, Firefly, X-Files, Supernatural, It's Always Sunny...the list is ever growing), feminism, space, animals, how awesome things are sometimes & things that make me laugh. If you read the Discworld books then we might already be best friends.
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Series Two + Scenery

(via doctorwhoblog)

  • 15-year-old me: MOM I'm practically an ADULT ugggh you never let me do ANYTHING in olden times i could get MARRIED *eye roll into another dimension*
  • me now: for my birthday i want food and to stay on your health insurance

johnquincyadams:

Whenever a boy speaks to you just respond with “how fucking dare you”

(via postmodernismruinedme)

lemondifficult:

Taking mental health advice from pastry recipes.

lemondifficult:

Taking mental health advice from pastry recipes.

(via wow-suchbree-veryblog)

therealraewest:

Okay but imagine:

  • Peter Parker going to a fan convention as Spiderman
  • Peter Parker getting compliments on his Spiderman costume
  • Peter Parker entering a Spiderman Costume Contest
  • Peter Parker losing said contest
  • Peter Parker losing the contest to Deadpool

(via wow-suchbree-veryblog)

Researchers have shown that reading fiction promotes empathy. Children’s book author and illustrator, Anne Dewdney, echoes that finding when she argues that, “When we open a book, and share our voice and imagination with a child, that child learns to see the world through someone else’s eyes.” Sadly, studies reveal that parents in the U.S., Canada, and Great Britain spend less time reading and telling stories to their sons than to their daughters. In fact, in as early as nine months, researchers found a gender gap in literary activities.

thevictorianlady:

Snapshots of Virginia Woolf taken by Lady Ottoline Morrell, June 1923.

(via booklover)

oatmeal:

Bonus panel here.

robofists-revenge:

I once went to the Renaissance Fair dressed as Marty McFly, and nobody got the joke.

That will forever be one of the most disappointing moments in my life.

(via postmodernismruinedme)

Okay, okay, I’m going to tell you what Hermione sees in Ron.

A trio is a balancing act, right? They’re equalizers of each other. Harry’s like the action, Hermione’s the brains, Ron’s the heart. Hermione has been assassinated in these movies, and I mean that genuinely—by giving her every single positive character trait that Ron has, they have assassinated her character in the movies. She’s been harmed by being made to be less human, because everything good Ron has, she’s been given.

So, for instance: “If you want to kill Harry, you’re going to have to kill me too”—RON, leg is broken, he’s in pain, gets up and stands in front of Harry and says this. Who gets that line in the movie? Hermione.

“Fear of a name increases the fear of the thing itself.” Hermione doesn’t say Voldemort’s name until well into the books—that’s Dumbledore’s line. When does Hermione say it in the movies? Beginning of Movie 2.

When the Devil’s Snare is curling itself around everybody, Hermione panics, and Ron is the one who keeps his head and says “Are you a witch or not?” In the movie, everybody else panics and Hermione keeps her head and does the biggest, brightest flare of sunlight spell there ever was.

So, Hermione—all her flaws were shaved away in the films. And that sounds like you’re making a kick-ass, amazing character, and what you’re doing is dehumanizing her. And it pisses me off. It really does.

In the books, they balance each other out, because where Hermione gets frazzled and maybe her rationality overtakes some of her instinct, Ron has that to back it up; Ron has a kind of emotional grounding that can keep Hermione’s hyper-rationalness in check. Sometimes Hermione’s super-logical nature grates Harry and bothers him, and isn’t the thing he needs even if it’s the right thing, like when she says “You have a saving people thing.” That is the thing that Harry needed to hear, she’s a hundred percent right, but the way she does it is wrong. That’s the classic “she’s super logical, she’s super brilliant, but she doesn’t know how to handle people emotionally,” at least Harry.

So in the books they are this balanced group, and in the movies, in the movies—hell, not even Harry is good enough for Hermione in the movies. No one’s good enough for Hermione in the movies—God isn’t good enough for Hermione in the movies! Hermione is everybody’s everything in the movies.

Harry’s idea to jump on the dragon in the books, who gets it in the movies? Hermione, who hates to fly. Hermione, who overcomes her withering fear of flying to take over Harry’s big idea to get out of the—like, why does Hermione get all these moments?

[John: Because we need to market the movie to girls.]

I think girls like the books, period. And like the Hermione in the books, and like the Hermione in the books just fine before Hollywood made her idealized and perfect. And if they would have trusted that, they would have been just fine.

Would the movies have been bad if she was as awesome as she was in the books, and as human as she was in the books? Would the movies get worse?

She IS a strong girl character. This is the thing that pisses me off. They are equating “strong” with superhuman. To me, the Hermione in the book is twelve times stronger than the completely unreachable ideal of Hermione in the movies. Give me the Hermione in the book who’s human and has flaws any single day of the week.

Here’s a classic example: When Snape in the first book yells at Hermione for being an insufferable know-it-all, do you want to know what Ron says in the book? “Well, you’re asking the questions, and she has to answer. Why ask if you don’t want to be told?” What does he say in the movie? “He’s got a point, you know.” Ron? Would never do that. Would NEVER do that, even before he liked Hermione. Ron would never do that.

Melissa Anelli THROWS IT DOWN about the way Ron and Hermione have been adapted in the movies on the latest episode of PotterCast. Listen here. This glorious rant starts at about 49:00. (via karakamos)

(via fuckyeahwomenprotesting)

pirikko:

why won’t you just believe 

(via postmodernismruinedme)

portablemiah:

i would describe my art style as post-kindergarten scribblecore

(via crrocs)

onthesideoftheotters:

bodysexgender:

vexednature:

tuxedoandex:

modernvampiresofnewyork:

What girls look for in guys

  • brown eyes
  • messy hair
  • cute nose
  • 4 paws
  • golden retriever 

but a man looking for a certain thing in girls? misogyny right? guys can’t be like “I look for girls who wear glasses and are thin and like to talk” nope that’s misogyny and it’s horrible. “equality”

oh my god did you even bother reading the post -______-

"not ALL dogs"

m’owner

(via fuckyeahhardfemme)